Main Dish

Tandoori Masala Marinade for Tempeh or Tofu

A few weeks ago we posted a guide on how to make tempeh with yellow split peas. As we mentioned in the post, tempeh has been one of our favourite things to make recently and it’s been fun experimenting with different flavours & ways to cook it. We’re excited to share this delicious tandoori masala marinade which is made with coconut cream and a mixture of herbs and spices. Ingredients like tempeh or tofu are notorious for being quite bland on their own, and although our homemade tempeh has a delicious nutty flavour, it’s even better when marinaded for a few hours before cooking. This Indian-style recipe has a lovely balance of flavours from the coconut combined with tandoori spice mix, which is traditionally made from cumin, coriander, ginger, paprika, turmeric & cayenne. We love it topped with toasted sesame seeds and mixed into a big salad with fermented veggies!

Tandoori Marinaded Tempeh
Tandoori Marinaded Tempeh
Tandoori Marinaded Tempeh
Tandoori Marinaded Tempeh

Tandori Masala Marinade for Tempeh or Tofu

Servings: Makes enough to marinade 250g tempeh/tofu

Ingredients:

  • 250g tempeh, cut into approx 16 pieces (you can substitue this for one block of firm tofu that has been thoroughly drained)

For the Marinade:

  • 200ml coconut cream (the cream from one can of coconut milk + the coconut water if you need to make it up to 200ml)
  • 2 large cloves of garlic, chopped
  • 1 thumb sized piece of ginger, chopped
  • 3 tsp good quality tandoori spice mix
  • small bunch fresh coriander
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 fresh green chili, seeds removed (optional)

Instructions:

  1. In a food processor blend together all of the ingredients for the marinade
  2. Spread out the tempeh pieces in a shallow dish or tupperware, pour over the marinade and gently turn the tempeh over so that they are fully covered.
  3. Cover the dish and leave to sit for at least 2 hours, alternatively leave overnight in the fridge.
  4. Transfer the tempeh pieces to an oven tray, spooning over any extra marinade from the dish. Bake at gas mark 6/200 degrees C for approximately 20 minutes or until beginning to dry out and turn golden

How do you normally prepare tofu or tempeh? We’d love to hear your suggestions below!

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How to Make Soy-Free Tempeh with Yellow Split Peas

For us, tempeh is one of those foods that is so much tastier when made at home. We’ve never been wowed by shop bought tempeh or considered it worth spending money on, but since we’ve been making this from scratch we’ve become complete tempeh converts. Making your own tempeh means you can get really creative with different legumes & flavourings too. This version with yellow split peas has a delicious, nutty flavour and due to the fermentation it’s a great option for people who find it hard to digest beans and other legumes. We also have a great tandoori marinade recipe for tempeh here.

How to Make Soy-Free Tempeh with Yellow Split Peas
How to Make Soy-Free Tempeh with Yellow Split Peas
How to Make Soy-Free Tempeh with Yellow Split Peas

What is Tempeh?

Tempeh originally hails from the island of Java in Indonesia. It often gets thrown into the same category as tofu, quorn and seitan as being a somewhat bland meat-replacement, but for us tempeh has a lot more flavour and also contains a lot of nutritional benefits. Traditionally, tempeh is made from soy beans which are soaked, cooked and then fermented using a specific culture called rhizopus oligosporus. As the beans ferment, they form into a block that is held together by a white fibrous network of mycelia. The tempeh can then be cut into slices and used in stir frys, curries, salads, sandwiches and more. It sounds like pretty freaky stuff on paper, but it has a great nutty flavour and is especially delicious marinaded!

Nutritional Benefits of Home-made Tempeh

Making your own tempeh definitely takes a lot more time than buying it from the shop, but we think it’s completely worth the effort in terms of flavour and also the variety of legumes you can use. Some nutritional benefits of home-made tempeh are as follows:

  • The fermentation process breaks down the phytic acid and anti-nutrients from the beans, which makes it easier to digest and absorb.

  • Studies show that tempeh is rich in prebiotics, which promote beneficial bacteria in the digestive system.

  • A rich source of protein & calcium

  • A whole foods alternative to tofu or quorn. Homemade tempeh is unprocessed & unpasteurised, therefore maintaining a lot more nutritional benefits and bacteria.

What You Need to Make Tempeh

  • A vented container: We use a freezer bag with 7-8 small holes in it that are large enough for air circulation. Using a clear container allows you see the tempeh as it ferments and you can reuse the bags after use. You could also a Tupperware with holes in.

  • A warm place for the beans to ferment: The beans have to be kept at a temperature of 25-30 degrees to begin the fermentation process. This takes around 12-24 hours. We use a dehydrator for this, but you could also use an oven with the light on (& the door slightly ajar), an electric blanket or a warm area in your house such as an airing cupboard.

  • A fermentation starter: You will need to purchase a starter to make the tempeh. We recommend this brand in the UK, you only need to use a small amount for each batch so it works out as good value.

  • Dried Beans: As mentioned, soya beans are traditionally used in tempeh recipes, however our favourite to use is yellow split peas as they have a great flavour. You can try various other types of beans and get creative with it. We recommend buying organic whenever possible.

  • A Tea Towl to wrap the tempeh in during the fermentation.

How to Make Soy-Free Tempeh with Yellow Split Peas
How to Make Soy-Free Tempeh with Yellow Split Peas

Ingredients

  • 500g of yellow split peas (or your legume of choice)

  • 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar (or white vinegar)

  • 1/3 teaspoon of tempeh starter

Method

  1. Soak the split peas overnight (or at least 6 hours).

  2. When ready, drain the peas and rinse once or twice with cold water.

  3. In a large saucepan add the peas and cover by 2-3 inches with water. Bring to the boil and then simmer gently for 20-30 minutes until just tender but not falling apart.

  4. Drain the cooked split peas in a colander and allow to cool, you want them to be almost completely dry. They should dry left out in the colander over 1-2 hours, or you can spread them on a clean tea-towel and pat dry.

  5. Add the peas to a bowl and stir in the apple cider vinegar and tempeh starter culture.

  6. Now spoon them into your vented container (freezer bag with holes poked through, or Tupperware, see above)

  7. Lightly press down the split peas in the bag so it lies flat and fairly even. Now store at 25-30 degrees C until you see a few areas of white, dust-like spots forming inside the bag (these can be quite subtle so look closely).

  8. Once the fermentation has started the tempeh will start creating its own heat, so you want to lower the temperature slightly to around 20-24 degrees C. Leave the bag/container wrapped in a clean tea towel for 24-36 hours (max 48) until the bag is fully colonised with the culture and has formed a solid block (see photo below). For this part we place the container in our airing cupboard.

  9. When the tempeh has become a solid block, remove it from the bag/container (this can take a bit of jiggling/squeezing to get it out) and store it in an air tight container in the fridge. Enjoy it fried, baked, grilled or on the barbecue.

NOTES - You may see some grey/black spots develop on the tempeh - this is normal and safe. It’s also common for the tempeh to smell slightly sour. If it begins to smell really bad/off or develops other colours then trust your instinct and discard it. (Thankfully this has never happened to us!)

How to Make Soy-Free Tempeh with Yellow Split Peas
How to make soy-free tempeh with yellow split peas

Have you tried tempeh before?

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Classic Vegan Bean Burger with Chestnut Mushrooms

Wherever in the world we travel we’re always in search of the ultimate veggie burger. The closest to perfect we’ve found was from this restaurant in Madrid, but since we don’t live there we’ve been on a mission to create something just as delicious at home. We’ve had many burger experiments in the kitchen…. trying all kinds of beans, veggies & grains to find the right combination. All of them have been tasty in their own way, but just not quite perfect enough. So when we made these mushroom and white bean burgers we knew we’d finally landed on a favourite recipe.
These burgers are full flavour, have a perfect texture that stays moist when cooked and holds together really well. When we hear the word ‘burger’ we don’t associate it with being healthy, but these veggie burgers are full of really nutritious ingredients and are a great alternative to more processed options. Another thing we love about them is that they freeze really well, so if you’re busy (who isn’t these days?) then it’s worthwhile to make a big batch to have ready for an easy addition to a meal.

White Bean & Mushroom Veggie Burgers
Chestnut Mushroom & White Bean Burgers

The main ingredients of the burgers are white beans, chestnut mushrooms and brown rice. The combination of these gives a really nice texture, while there’s lots of flavours coming from tahini, miso, lemon zest and fresh parsley. Instead of adding fried onions, we added a few dates to the mix which give a delicious sweetness without having extra oil. For this reason, the burgers are really light and fresh. We love to serve them with fermented veggies, a tahini dressing or cashew sauce and either in a homemade bun or with salad. This recipe is inspired by Anna Jones’s ‘Really Hungry Burger’, but we’ve added in some extras and adapted some quantities.

Chestnut Mushroom & White Bean Burgers

Chesnut Mushroom & White Bean Burgers

Servings: Males 14 large burgers (feel free to halve the recipe)

Ingredients:

  • 500g chesnut mushrooms, finely chopped (would work great with shitake)
  • 2 x 400g tins white beans, drained (we use cannellini)
  • 4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 100g oats
  • 8 medjool dates (or 16-20 normal dates soaked in hot water for 5 mins)
  • Grated zest of 1 unwaxed lemon
  • 2-3 tablespoons of dark miso paste
  • 4 tablespoons of tahini
  • 400g of cooked brown rice (200g uncooked weight)
  • a handful of fresh parsely
  • a few sprigs of thyme
  • 2 teaspoons of smoked paprika
  • 4 tablespoons tamari or soy souce
  • sea salt and black pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large saucepan, once hot add the mushrooms, thyme and paprika (you may need to do 2 batches in your pan depending on the size of your pan). Cook on a high heat until the mushrooms are browned and fairly dried out. If you have excess water in the pan from the mushrooms then drain it off. Season with salt and pepper and leave aside to cool.
  2. Into a food processor, add the drained beans, dates, garlic, parsley, tahini, tamari and miso. Blend until you have a smooth mixture.
  3. Transfer into a mixing bowl and combine with the cooked rice, oats, lemon zest and mushrooms. Mix well.
  4. Leave the burger mixture to firm up in the fridge for atleast 15 minutes.
  5. Preheat your oven to gas mark 7.
  6. When ready to cook, shape the mixture into patties and cook them on a baking tray in an oven at gasmark 7 for 12-15 minutes. You want a slight colour on the burgers but too much time in the oven will dry them out.
Chestnut Mushroom & White Bean Burgers

What’s the best veggie burger you’ve tried?
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Green Lasagna with Butternut Squash & Courgette (Zucchini)

It was somewhat of a challenge to name this recipe. Is lasagna really lasagna without a tomato sauce? I’m sure many Italians would react in horror to such a thing, but we assure you that this dish is a special one, no matter what label we decide to put on it. The thing is, although we both love lasagna, we often crave an alternative to tomato sauce. This time of year it’s pretty hard to find sweet and delicious tomatoes in England and we often end up being disappointed with their flavour, especially compared to our days living in Spain. When we set out to create this recipe a few weeks ago we had some incredible looking broccoli & cauliflower that was locally grown and calling out to be used. And so, the green lasagna was invented. We hope you love this as much as we do. It became an instant favourite for us and even though it has a few parts that you need to prepare, it’s definitely worth the effort.

Vegetarian Lasagna with Broccoli Green Sauce & Butternut Squash
Vegetarian Lasagna with Broccoli Green Sauce & Butternut Squash

The layers of our green lasagna are compiled from lasagna sheets, a delicious green sauce packed with veggies, a creamy white sauce made with oat milk, and layers of butternut squash & courgette (zucchini). You can use any lasagna sheets to make this, but we love the green lentil pasta sheets by the brand Explore.

Vegetarian Lasagna with Broccoli Green Sauce
Vegetarian Lasagna with Broccoli Green Sauce & Butternut Squash
Vegetarian Lasagna with Broccoli Green Sauce & Butternut Squash
Vegetarian Lasagna with Broccoli Green Sauce & Butternut Squash
Vegetarian Lasagna with Broccoli Green Sauce & Butternut Squash
Vegetarian Lasagna with Broccoli Green Sauce & Butternut Squash
Vegetarian Lasagna with Broccoli Green Sauce & Butternut Squash

Green Lasagna Bake with Butternut Squash & Courgette

Ingredients

(Our baking tray is roughly 12 x 9 inches.)

For the green sauce:
750ml vegetable stock (home made or vegetable stock cube)
200g broccoli, chopped
1 onion, finely sliced
1 cup spinach (packed)
200g cauliflower, chopped
salt and pepper to taste

For the white sauce:
1 litre oat milk
3-4 tablespoons nutritional yeast
6 tablespoons spelt flour
2 tablespoons white miso (optional)
salt and pepper to taste

also:
400g butternut squash, thinly cut into as wide slices as possible
2 medium courgettes, thinly sliced
18 sheets lasagna pasta (we use a gluten free green lentil brand)
olive oil
oregano

Method

To make the green sauce:
Add the stock, onion, broccoli, cauliflower and half a teaspoon of salt to a saucepan and bring to a boil. cook for around 10 minutes. Then add the spinach and cook for a further 1-2 minutes. Check the seasoning, add black pepper and salt to taste. Turn off the heat and blend the whole mix until completely smooth using either an immersion of normal blender.

To make the white sauce:
Add all of the oat milk to a sauce pan and gently bring to a simmer. Sprinkle in the flour gradually while whisking to combine. Don’t worry if it’s a little lumpy at this stage. Continue to gently simmer the sauce while whisking for 10 or so minutes until well thickened. Add the nutritional yeast, miso and season generously to taste. Ideally allow the sauce to cool for a while in order to continue thickening.

Assembling & cooking the lasagna:
When both your sauces are ready, assemble the lasagna. We like to sprinkle plenty of oregano and drizzle olive oil between the layers. This is the order we like to put it together, starting from the bottom:
A layer of white sauce
Pasta sheets
A layer green sauce
Butternut squash
A layer of white sauce
Pasta sheets
A layer green sauce
Pasta sheets
Combination of green/white sauces (depending on how much is left)
Courgettes on top with olive oil and oregano

Bake in the oven at gas mark 6, covered with a lid or flat baking tray for approximately 30 minutes. Then remove the cover and cook for another 15 minutes, until the top is golden brown and a knife will go easily through the pasta. Allow to cool slightly before serving.


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